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I Wanted to Know What White Men Thought About Their Privilege. So I Asked.

I Wanted to Know What White Men Thought About Their Privilege. So I Asked.

By Claudia Rankine

“My college class asks what it means to be white in America — but interrogating that question as a black woman in the real world is much harder to do.”

Your Liberation is on the Line

Your Liberation is on the Line

By Rev. Angel Kyodo Williams

“No one who has ever touched liberation could possibly want anything other than liberation for everyone,” says Rev. angel Kyodo williams. She shares why we must each fully commit to our own path to liberation, for the benefit of all.

100:1 The Crack Legacy

100:1 The Crack Legacy

By Christopher Johnson

This documentary series exposes the link between punitive drug laws drawn up during the 80’s war on crack cocaine and contemporary police violence that disproportionately affects black Americans.

13th

13th

Ava Du Vernay, Director

Powerful, infuriating and at times overwhelming, this documentary will get your blood boiling and tear ducts leaking. It shakes you up, but it also challenges your ideas about the intersection of race, justice and mass incarceration in the United States, subject matter that could not sound less cinematic.

6 Ways Well-Intentioned People Whitesplain Racism (And Why They Need to Stop)

6 Ways Well-Intentioned People Whitesplain Racism (And Why They Need to Stop)

By Maisha Z. Johnson

Picture this: You’re fed up with being the target of street harassment. If you’re a woman, queer, trans, and/or gender non-conforming, it’s probably not hard to imagine. Just think of one of those days when you’ve gotten too many unsolicited comments on your appearance, too many requests to “smile,” too many strangers who feel entitled to your space, time, and image..

Accidental Courtesy

Accidental Courtesy

Darryl Davis, Director

Daryl Davis is an accomplished musician, a piano player who has played all over the world with legends like Jerry Lee Lewis, Little Richard, and Chuck Berry. He also has an unusual and controversial hobby: Daryl likes to meet and befriend members of the KKK, many of whom have never met a black person.

A Rap on Race: Rare Conversation on Forgiveness and the Difference Between Guilt and Responsibility

A Rap on Race: Rare Conversation on Forgiveness and the Difference Between Guilt and Responsibility

With Margaret Mead and James Baldwin

On the evening of August 25, 1970, Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901–November 15, 1978) and James Baldwin (August 2, 1924–December 1, 1987) sat together on a stage in New York City for a remarkable public conversation about such enduring concerns as identity, power and privilege, race and gender, beauty, religion, justice, and the relationship between the intellect and the imagination.

A Vision for Black Lives

A Vision for Black Lives

Policy Demands for Black Power, Freedom, and Justice

Between the World and Me

Between the World and Me

By Ta-Nehisi Coates

In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offer a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis.

Code Switch

Code Switch

NPR podcast hosted by Gene Demby and Shereen Marisol Meraji

Ever find yourself in a conversation about race and identity where you just get...stuck? Code Switch can help. We’re all journalists of color, and this isn’t just the work we do. It’s the lives we lead...

Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity

Cracking the Codes: The System of Racial Inequity

A World Trust film

This film asks America to talk about the causes and consequences of systemic inequity. Designed for dialogue, the film works to disentangle internal beliefs, attitudes and pre-judgments within, and it builds skills to address the structural drivers of social and economic inequities.

Curriculum for White Americans to Educate Themselves on Race and Racism–from Ferguson to Charleston

Curriculum for White Americans to Educate Themselves on Race and Racism–from Ferguson to Charleston

By Jon Greenberg

Compilied in 2015, has links to articles specifically writtten for white americans as well as Parenting racially-concious children.

Ear Hustle

Ear Hustle

By Radiotopia from PRX

Ear Hustle brings you stories of life inside prison, shared and produced by those living it. The podcast is a partnership between Nigel Poor, a Bay Area visual artist and Earlonne Woods, formerly incarcerated at San Quentin State Prison, and was co-founded with fellow inmate Antwan Williams.

Emergent Strategy

Emergent Strategy

Adrienne Maree Brown

Inspired by Octavia Butler's explorations of our human relationship to change, Emergent Strategy is radical self-help, society-help, and planet-help designed to shape the futures we want to live. Change is constant. The world is in a continual state of flux. It is a stream of ever-mutating, emergent patterns.

Healing Justice

Healing Justice

Kate Wearning, Director

A podcast for stories and practices and the intersection of collective healing and social change.

Hidden Brain: Rap on Trial

Hidden Brain: Rap on Trial

By NPR

Olutosin Oduwole was a college student and aspiring rapper when he was charged with "attempting to make a terrorist threat." We explore how perceptions of rap music may have played a role.

How to Be an Antiracist

How to Be an Antiracist

By Ibram Kendi
Ibram X. Kendi's concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in America – but even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. Instead of working with the policies and system we have in place, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it.

Holistic Resistance

Holistic Resistance

Aaron Johnson is an earth builder, teacher of closeness, and activist. He graduated from the California Institute of the Arts in 2007 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts. He has made a lifelong commitment to use the skills he possesses to end racism. In addition to using intimacy and closeness to blackness as a primary means to that end, the tools he frequently uses are speaking, teaching, singing, photography, filmmaking, and minimalism. Aaron leads a mentoring program called Turn It Up Now that focuses on elevating the power, talent, love, and work ethic of youth.

I Am Not Your Negro

I Am Not Your Negro

Raoul Peck, Director

Though its principal figure, the novelist, playwright and essayist James Baldwin, is a man who has been dead for nearly 30 years, you would be hard-pressed to find a movie that speaks to the present moment with greater clarity and force, insisting on uncomfortable truths and drawing stark lessons from the shadows of history.

Invisibilia: The Culture Inside

Invisibilia: The Culture Inside

By NPR

This episode of an otherwise great podcast is a good exploration into implicit bias.

Letter to My Whiteness (and Yours)

Letter to My Whiteness (and Yours)

By Odessa Avianna Perez

Great blog about the scripts white people use to NOT have to talk about race and racism. It then offers medicine for what to do instead.

Life After Life

Life After Life

After decades behind bars, three men set out to prove success can lie on the other side of tragedy.

Love and Radio: How to Argue

Love and Radio: How to Argue

NPR podcast

In Part I, we return to an old episode: The Silver Dollar, featuring Daryl Davis, a black musician who has made it his life’s work to befriend white racists. In Part II, we pay Daryl a visit to see what he can tell us about how to successfully argue — or even just have a civil, critical conversation — with someone who holds opinions very different from your own. Think of it as a field guide to arguing.

Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible

Mirrors of Privilege: Making Whiteness Visible

A World Trust film

Use this groundbreaking film and conversation guide in your organization to help bridge the gap between good intentions and meaningful change. Featuring stories from white men and women on overcoming issues of unconscious bias and entitlement, it is an powerful and unique tool in diversity work.

Me And White Supremacy Workbook

Me And White Supremacy Workbook

The long anticipated workbook from Layla F. Saad’s #meandwhitesupremacy Instagram challenge is here. Part education, part activation, the Me And White Supremacy Workbook is a first-of-its-kind personal anti-racism tool for people holding white privilege to begin to examine and dismantle their complicity in the oppressive system of white supremacy.

Get the workbook Me and White Supremacy

Mindful of Race with Ruth King

Mindful of Race with Ruth King

In this podcast, mindfulness meditation teacher Ruth King describes how members of any dominant group rarely see themselves as "membered." We usually see ourselves as good individuals without confronting our group identity. 

On Being: Isabel Wilkerson: The Heart is the Last Frontier

On Being: Isabel Wilkerson: The Heart is the Last Frontier

Podcast hosted by Krista Tippett

Love Wilkerson’s analogy of loving and taking care of an old house. How we don’t always want to go into the basement, but what we ignore won’t go away.

Raising Race Conscious Children

Raising Race Conscious Children

A resource to support adults who are trying to talk about race with young children. The goals of these conversations are to dismantle the color-blind framework and prepare young people to work toward racial justice.

Reclaiming our Indigenous European roots

Reclaiming our Indigenous European roots

By Lyla June

Our task as European-ancestored people, seeing what's been hidden beyond our short-sighted view of history, and why healing isn't possible in the absence of love.

Revisionist History: Miss Buchanan's Period of Adjustment

Revisionist History: Miss Buchanan's Period of Adjustment

By Malcolm Gladwell

In this Season 2 episode... A landmark Supreme Court case. A civil rights revolution. Why has everyone forgotten what happened next?

Seeing White

Seeing White

Producer John Biewen and Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University

Where did the notion of “whiteness” come from? What does it mean? What is whiteness for? Scene on Radio host and producer John Biewen took a deep dive into these questions, along with an array of leading scholars and regular guest Dr. Chenjerai Kumanyika, in this fourteen-part documentary series, released between February and August 2017. The series editor is Loretta Williams.

So You Want to Talk About Race

So You Want to Talk About Race

By Ijeoma Oluo

Ijeoma Oluo explores the complex reality of today’s racial landscape–from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement–offering straightforward clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide.

  • Read So You Want to Talk About Race

Speak Out with Tim Wise

Speak Out with Tim Wise

Hosted by Tim Wise

Speak Out with Tim Wise is an informative and entertaining podcast focused on racial and economic justice in the age of Trump. It features the biting and humorous commentary of its host, along with interviews with some of the nation’s leading scholars, activists and artists as well as grass roots organizers whose voices are often ignored in mainstream media.

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

By Ibram X. Kendi

Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first Black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America - more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society.

Tears We Cannot Stop: Sermon to White America

Tears We Cannot Stop: Sermon to White America

By Michael Eric Dyson

Short, emotional, literary, powerful―Tears We Cannot Stop is the book that all Americans who care about the current and long-burning crisis in race relations will want to read.

The Case for Reparations

The Case for Reparations

By Ta-Nehisi Coates

Two hundred fifty years of slavery. Ninety years of Jim Crow. Sixty years of separate but equal. Thirty-five years of racist housing policy. Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole.

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

By Michelle Alexander

The “explosive debut” (Kirkus Reviews) from a rising legal star in America arguing that we have not ended racial caste in America—we have simply redesigned it.

You Had Me at Black

You Had Me at Black

By Martina and Britney Abrahams, Founder and Co-Founder

Martina and Britney Abrahams are the sister team behind this Oakland podcast. Their mission is to reclaim the black narrative by sharing stories about the parts of the black experience often ignored in the media. Every episode is worth a listen.

White Anti-Racism: Living the Legacy

White Anti-Racism: Living the Legacy

By Teaching Tolerance

What does "white anti-racist" mean? How can guilt get in the way? And what's all this talk about being "colorblind"? Teaching Tolerance asked community activists to share their thoughts on these questions, and others. Their answers shine light on the concepts of comfort, power, privilege and identity.

White Fragility -- Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism

White Fragility -- Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism

By Robin Diangelo

In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

By Peggy McIntosh

This article first appeared in Peace and Freedom Magazine, July/August, 1989, a publication of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, Philadelphia, PA.

Whose Streets

Whose Streets

Sabaah Folayan, Director

An account of the Ferguson uprising as told by the people who lived it. The filmmakers look at how the killing of 18-year-old Michael Brown inspired a community to fight back and sparked a global movement.

When They See Us

When They See Us

When They See Us is a 2019 American drama web television miniseries created, co-written, and directed by Ava DuVernay for Netflix, that premiered in four parts on May 31, 2019. It is based on events of the 1989 Central Park jogger case and explores the lives and families of the five male suspects who were prosecuted on charges related to the rape and assault of a woman in Central Park, New York City. The series features an ensemble cast, including Jharrel Jerome, Asante Blackk, Jovan Adepo, Michael K. Williams, Logan Marshall-Green, Joshua Jackson, Blair Underwood, Vera Farmiga, John Leguizamo, Felicity Huffman, Niecy Nash, Aunjanue Ellis, Marsha Stephanie Blake, and Kylie Bunbury.